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7/25/16

What to Wear for Senior Photos

I took my Senior Photos in Rhode Island last August, and I know a ton of other girls at my school took theirs around the same time as well. With senior photos just around the corner for the class of 2017, there comes a little bit of stress with what to wear, how to do hair and makeup, and where to shoot. Luckily, professional photographers are pros for a reason, so they’re good at picking locations, telling you how to tilt your head for the perfect look, and they’re even pretty good about making sure all flyaways are tame and there isn’t any mascara on your eyelids. However, one thing that you have to do before you meet up with your photographer is pick out a couple of outfits, or at least a few different tops for your shoot. 

When I did my senior pictures I wore white jeans, and I brought one short-sleeve top, a sleeveless top, and a sweater. I did my photos on the Cliff Walk in Newport so I knew I wouldn’t want to be in a dress or skirt, but I always think it’s cute when girls do one outfit with pants, one with a skirt, and another with a dress. I wouldn't suggest doing more than three outfits because you might feel overwhelmed when you’re trying to fit in all of your outfit changes during the actual shoot, and it’s also rare that you will actually find a place to change that isn’t behind a bush, a tree, or your mom (it's true). 




When it comes to picking the outfit, here are a few tips:

1. Make sure you're comfortable // This is extremely obvious, but it's important to remember that if you're feeling uncomfortable, even if that means you're just a little too hot or too chilly in your outfit, you won't be focused on smiling and looking good for the camera. Rather, you'll be stressed about how you're sweating, or you're shirt is poking out, etc.

2. Patterns are cute, but steer clear of stripes, graphics and plaid // I think it's really cute when girls wear Lilly tops or dresses, for example, because the patterns and bright colors peek out in the picture and add a little personality. However, stripes and plaid are notorious for just not photographing well, and occasionally making people look wide. Stripes and plaid are also more distracting to the eye because of the symmetrical/geometric pattern. Graphics are also generally too random and casual. However, if you're really against looking too basic in a solid top, remember that fun textures and detailing always look good, like lace or crochet.

3. Pick a flattering sleeve and neckline // In general, your outfit should be a flattering one, of course. That's another obvious one! You want to look good, so don't wear something that doesn't make you look great. If you’re self-conscious about your arms, avoid sleeveless or cap-sleeve shirts and tank tops, as they tend to make arms look fuller. For necklines, it's easy for collars to get messed up if they're popped, so only choose a polo or button down if you prefer to keep your color down (I personally rarely keep my collar down!), and since off-shoulder is trending, I just want to point out that you might run the risk of looking like you went sans clothing if you opt for a top like that.

4. Know what colors look good on you // This is pretty basic, but make sure you're not wearing something that might make you look washed out, blend in with your hair/skin, etc. 

Overall, I would recommend picking outfits that are easy to change in and out of, don't really worry about shoes too much (trust me, the pictures people end up using for senior photos are rarely full body pictures, which makes sense because in a yearbook you want to focus on your face and pic a closer shot), and try to have at least one top be a solid color as it's the least distracting and often most flattering!

Shop below for a few ideas of what to wear if you're still a little unsure:



xoxo

1 comment :

  1. These are great tips! I'm a rising senior and will be doing my pictures soon so this is SO helpful!

    xoxo,
    Katie
    chicincarolina.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete

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